Can Exercise Cause Migraines

Can Exercise Cause Migraines

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can exercise cause migraines? Yes, It can exercise can aid in headache relief, there are a wide variety of headache types with even more causes, so a list of headache relief cures that will work for any type of headache is just not possible. But there are some headache relief measures that will work to relieve or at least diminish the pain caused by all headaches.

The best way to have headache relief is to prevent them. Make sure you are not skipping any meals and are eating enough protein. Going on a diet and eating less calories will always cause headaches for the first few days.You can try exercising your neck muscles. This will surely relieve the tension you experience during a headache and will stimulate the blood flow to this part of the body. You can rotate your head clockwise and then anticlockwise slowly. Another exercise requires you to straighten your back, face forward and lean your head to the right and then to the left attempting to touch your shoulder with you ear. Pulling your chin towards your neck is a super effective exercise.

Migraine headaches occur as muscles at the sides of the neck get excessively tense. While no conclusive theoretical explanation exists as to why alleviating that tension ends migraine headaches, that fact has consistently been observed. One possible explanation for migraine headaches is that the major blood vessels that go into and come from the head pass under and around those muscles. Within those blood vessels are pressure-sensors (baroreceptors) that enable the brain to regulate the blood pressure of the head. When the overlying muscles of the neck contract, they squeeze these blood vessels; the resulting change in blood flow affects the pressure sensors, causing abnormal regulation of blood pressure in the brain. That is, as I say, one possible explanation.

There is no science that shows that exercise has a direct hand in preventing migraines, however there is science that tells us that it has an indirect effect. You see, exercise has been proven to reduce stress, and stress has been pinpointed as a cause of migraine headaches. Exercise also improves the circulation, which brings more oxygen to all of the cells in the body, and actually helps to keep the blood vessels open. Tightening blood vessels have also been proven to contribute to migraine headaches.

In order to reduce your migraine attacks, you must perform moderate exercise every day.  If you are taking martial arts classes of any kind, it is recommended that you attend these classes daily instead of attending them once a week. Certain Martial Arts like Krav Maga are designed for the Elite and are hence strenuous.For those who suffer from frequent migraines, “trigger” is a familiar word. We have been told that there are certain food triggers that may precede migraine pain.If you want to lose weight while helping to ease your headaches take a look at the garcinia cambogia review.

Some of the more familiar triggers include alcohol and foods that contain tyramine, sodium nitrate or phenylalanine. Some examples of these foods include chocolate, processed meats, peanut butter and certain aged cheeses. In addition to the specific items, a diet high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables can also have a negative effect. For instance, fasting or dehydration can make migraine pain worse or increase frequency. Research is inconclusive as to the effects of diet and exercise on migraine pain. However, for anyone who has ever dealt with the debilitating pain associated with this type of ailment, it’s definitely worth giving it a try.

 

Resource

http://americasmorningnews.info/does-garcinia-cambogia-work/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headache

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/14/ask-well-exercise-and-headaches/?_r=0

 

 

 

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